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NEWS

CATCH UP WITH THE LATEST GLOBAL NEWS

In a recent article in GQ Magazine, Michel Roux Jr provides a very inspiring insight into Le Gavroche, and talks about his preferred ‘kitchen tools’, which includes his number one, Global knives.

For the full story, please click here.


Last week, sponsors of the Roux Scholarship from all over the UK were invited to the supporters lunch at The Waterside hosted by the Roux family.

For the full story, please click here.


Global Knives has been nominated for the Icon Award in the finals of the prestigious Excellence in Housewares Awards 2017!

For the full story, please click here.


Last week, Mr Global paid a visit to the UK to do a number of in-store knife sharpening demonstrations alongside following his favourite Tennis player in the Wimbledon games.

For the full story, please click here.


Luke Selby, winner of Roux Scholarship 2017, has chosen Nihonryori Ryugin in Tokyo as his stage for the next three months.

For the full story, please click here.


We are very happy to announce that we have a new online stockist of Global Knives – Knives From Japan.

For the full story, please click here.


Don’t miss out on our great Global Santoku deals.

For the full story, please click here.


Charles and David Grunwerg receive the Donald Bird award by CESA (Catering Equipment Suppliers Association) after showing great dedication and commitment to the catering industry for over 70 years.

For the full story, please click here.


We are very happy to announce that Simon Bewsey-Dyke, from Guernsey, has won a SAI knife block set after we received his great feedback from the questionnaire that can be found with every Kazoku set purchase.

For the full story, please click here.


Luke Selby was presented with the Roux Scholarship crown at the awards ceremony on Monday 10th April after impressing the Roux Scholarship judging panel in what can only be explained as a jaw breaking final!

For the full story, please click here.


This week, the Roux family have revealed their final 18 chefs who have successfully impressed the judges and made their way into the semi-finals of the Roux Scholarship 2017.

For the full story, please click here.


Take a look at the recent video of Emily Roux and her father, Michel Roux Jnr, cooking up a feast using the best knives in the business… Global Knives.

To watch the video, please click here.


Spring Fair and Ambiente are officially over so we’d like to say a huge “thank you” to anyone and everyone who visited our stands. Once again both shows have proven to be very successful amid this busy buying season and we have opened some great new accounts!

For the full story, please click here.


As Valentine’s Day approaches, we can only imagine that you’re starting to put a plan for the perfect day into action. If you’ve already decided on the gift and how to spend your evening, we commend you on being so organised! If you’re still waiting for the perfect idea to materialise, we’d like to help give you a nudge in the right direction.

For the full story, please click here.


Global Knives UK has once again beaten competitors, eight times running, to receive top place in the annual Chef’s Choice Awards 2017.

For the full story, please click here.


Global Knives UK would like to congratulate Singapore for coming first in the Culinary Olympics 2016.

The IKA Culinary Olympics is one of the biggest cooking competitions in the world, with more than 2,000 chefs from 59 nations preparing over 7,000 fresh meals in order to satisfy the palettes of a judging panel.

For the full story, please click here.


Were you one of those lucky individuals who received a brand new Global knife for Christmas? Were you even luckier to unwrap a whole knife block with knives?

Either way, welcome to Global! We do hope you enjoy your new set of knives, and that you will be a happy cooker for years to come!

For the full story, please click here.


It is a week before Christmas. In a perfect world, you have bought and wrapped all of your presents, the food has been bought and it is in the fridge, and the decorations are all nicely in place for the festive week ahead.

For the full story, please click here.


The festive season is now well and truly upon us and Global has the solution to make your party that little bit more special.

For the full story, please click here.


So you bought a brand new iPad for your loved one last Christmas. It was a special time, they loved it and use it all of the time. However, did you ever think of the consequences? Did you realise you automatically raised the bar for this year and need to match or go higher with your gift idea? Our new Knife pads are here for you!

For the full story, please click here.


At Global we take pride in the quality of our knives. We are known for our incredible sharp blades, our stylish handles and the durable CROMOVA 18 stainless steel material that is used to create such a wonderful masterpiece. With all of this in mind, we know you understand how much pride we have because of the blades’ outstanding performance when it comes to food preparation.

For the full story, please click here.


The BBC Good Food Show Birmingham starts next week and we are very excited to be, once again, joining hundreds of other big brands in the biggest food event of the year!

For the full story, please click here.


Every two years the Roux family arrange an exciting trip to a land of great cuisine, top chefs, beautiful scenery and late bars. Stuff dreams are made of!

For the full story, please click here.


Leaves have fallen off the trees; the cold wind is sweeping in and the days are getting shorter. This means only one thing in the cooking world. The Roux Scholarship is back!

For the full story, please click here.


Grunwerg are delighted to announce that Mr. Global himself, Mino Tsuchida, will be flying in from Japan to do a series of visits, including a special knife sharpening demo at the Business Design Centre in London.

For the full story, please click here.


Next week we will be in London for the Restaurant Show, and we have some very exciting treats for our visitors!

For the full story, please click here.


Our new Global Hybrid Kazoku sets are flying off the shelves!

For the full story, please click here.

EVENTS

CATCH UP WITH THE LATEST GLOBAL EVENTS IN THE UK


Come and visit us at The Restaurant Show 2017…

Olympia London: 2nd – 4th OCT 2017


Come and visit us at BBC Good Food Show 2017…

Birmingham NEC: 30th NOV – 3rd DEC 2017

BLOG

CATCH UP WITH THE LATEST GLOBAL GOSSIP HERE

When it comes to cooking, if not taught, we tend to wing it in the kitchen. This can be from cooking certain foods until we THINK it’s done to chopping and slicing foods in a manner that feels most comfortable to us.

What if I told you that some forms of cutting can be dangerous to you and damaging to your knives? Would you think about changing the way you chop your meat and vegetables? If so, read the following tips below and learn to prep like a professional for the rest of your life!

Finger Frolicking

When chopping, curl the fingers of your subordinate hand inwards (towards your palm) so that you don’t take the tips of them off. It may sound dramatic but it does happen! When you’ve done that and placed your hand on the vegetable/fruit/meat that you’re wanting to hold steady, place the flat of the knife against your knuckles and try not to raise the knife past the second knuckle as you cut. We say ‘try’ as this can be difficult when switching from an up & down chopper to a back & forth chopper. If cutting was quick & simple to master, we’d all be born pros!

Knife Knowledge

It goes without saying that you should always use the right knife for the job. For example, don’t use a utility knife for cutting watermelon and don’t use a bread knife for cutting fish. Using the wrong type of knife can be very dangerous as there is a chance that it could break or cause serious harm during the process of cutting. The wrong knife can also tear and ruin delicate foods such as fish. If you’re unsure of what knife to use either grab your trusty Chef’s Knife, the perfect all-rounder, or Google it.

Before you start chopping, ensure that your knives are at the top of their game by making sure that they’re as sharp as can be. Blunt knives makes for harder work as, rather than a fluid, sweeping motion of cutting, you’re left with a hacking, pulling version instead. This is a very dangerous, strenuous form of cutting that can lead to serious injury.

All-Inclusive Advice

As mentioned earlier, the motion that you should be making when cutting is a back and forth movement, NOT an up and down one. The mechanics of this movement is to simply push the knife blade down and then forward (away from the body) in one fluid motion without the knife ever leaving the chopping board. The reason for this technique is that it is safer, quicker and a lot kinder to your knife blades. Remember; if you’re chopping up and down, you’re continually hitting your blade against a hard surface with quite a large amount of force. That can’t be healthy for the blade now, can it?

Finally, be sure to use a stable surface when chopping. If you own a large, heavy wooden board that you can barely pick up let alone move with one hand, you should be safe to get away without making any modifications. However, if you’re using a light surface that easily moves, the best thing to do is arrange a nice damp cloth under the board. The water will make the cloth stick to both the counter underneath and the surface of the chopping board you’re using. If you’re looking at getting a new chopping board, we’d recommend an end-grain as these are self healing boards that offer a somewhat cushioned impact for your knives. The board in the right-hand side picture is a end-grain from Rockingham Forge.

Have you been using your knives wrong this whole time and will you be changing your ways for the better?


A lot of people assume that the job of a chef is to go into a kitchen, receive an order and cook everything that has been requested. Although most chefs are trained to overcome anything you throw at them, a modern day busy kitchen just wouldn’t survive with that sort of set up.

Imagine, a busy restaurant and 50+ orders of all sorts of different foods cooked in all sorts of different ways. One chef per dish wouldn’t have a quick enough turnover compared to a Henry Ford style kitchen where certain chefs are in charge of certain areas of the dish. So here is a basic run down of what each chef does:

Head Chef or Executive Chef

The Head Chef is top of the food chain – no pun intended! They oversee the entire workings of the kitchen. From penning new menus to keeping the kitchen on time, this job title is reserved for the most skilled & experienced of chefs.

Sous Chef

Wingman to the Executive Chef, the Sous Chef does more micromanaging. They observe each dish and will get stuck in when needed. In the absence of a Head Chef, the Sous Chef oversees the kitchen.

Pastry Chef

The Pastry Chef, usually qualified in the Baking Arts rather than Culinary Arts, is in charge of creating breads and desserts. Depending on the establishment, the Dessert Chef may even be subject to designing the dessert menu.

Station Chef

In every kitchen there are different stations e.g. grill or soup. The Station Chef is in charge of one set station where they are in control of getting dishes out at their highest quality in their best appearance.

Pantry Chef

The Pantry Chef is in charge of all manner of cold produce, such as salads and dressings. The main objective of the Pantry Chef is to make the food look presentable for when it reaches the customer.

Saucier

As you may have already guessed from the name, the Saucier is solely in charge of creating the sauces.

Commis Chef

The Commis Chef is an entry-level position and can only be described as being the ad-hoc role of the culinary world. As their work depends on what needs to be done in the rest of the kitchen, they have to be a fairly versatile cook.

Tell us, which role if any, would suit your cooking skills best? Tweet us with your answers.


A delicate task, filleting fish should be both quick and precise as a messy fillet is an unattractive dish. Before we begin the proper steps for filleting, however, I should first turn your attention to certain kitchen equipment and pre-hand steps that should be done by either you or your fishmonger.

Choosing your fish

When it comes to purchasing fish from your local supermarket or fishmongers, you will usually find that it has already been de-scaled. This will save you time and an extra step so be sure that if you have the choice as to whether it be descaled or not, choose the former. Be sure, just before you buy the fish, that there is no strong stench to it and that the eyes aren’t dull. These two properties mean that the fish is not fresh.

Choosing your equipment

What you will need is a cutting board, a pair of tweezers (preferably fishbone) and a flexible filleting knife. The reason for a flexible knife is that the blade will move easier and cleaner between both bones and flesh. Make sure that the knife you choose is straight-edged and isn’t serrated as this will rip the flesh rather than producing a nice, neat cut.

Steps to filleting your fish

Step One: First things first, place your fish on the chopping board and, taking the knife, remove each fin on either side of the head and on the underbelly of your fish. Then, with the tip of the knife, incise the stomach near the tail and cut the belly open by running your blade all the way along to the head. Once this is done, simply clear the fish of its guts and run it under cold water. This will clean the fish and make filleting that bit easier.

Step Two: At this point, you can choose to either leave the head attached or choose to remove it from the body. To do the latter, make a large cut around the head following under the gills and it should come away with ease.

Step Three: When you’re ready to start the filleting process, simply run your knife from the head (or that direction) towards the tail keeping as close to the spine as possible. Be sure to keep your free hand under the already cut flesh so that you are aware of how far down the fish you have cut and so that the strokes are neat and clean. Once you have done this, remove the fillet by cutting along the bottom and trim away any skin or fat that will not be eaten.

Step Four: Once you’re happy with your first fillet, it’s time to get started on the second one. Be warned; the second fillet tends to be more difficult to release as there is now less support since cutting away the flesh from the other side. Once you have removed the fillet, again, trim away any unwanted fat and then grab the tweezers.

Step Five: Running your hand along the fillet surface, you will find the pin bones along the centre of the fillet close to the head. To remove these bones, simply grab one end with your tweezers and very gently tug until the bone comes free. Do this until your hand no longer feels any bones as you run it along the fillet.

Once your fillets are de-boned all that’s left to do is cook them and we’d love to know what you’re making so please leave us a comment on Twitter & Facebook with your delightful dish (images not essential but greatly desired!).


You’re finally taking cooking seriously and are planning on kitting out your kitchen with a new set of swanky knives but you have no idea where to begin. Most kitchens and their knives vary from person to person as it’s based on preference and brand of cooking, however, we’ve put together a small list of kitchen knives that the typical chef will always have in his or her house to make food preparation that much easier.

Cook’s Knife

A multi-purpose knife, this is a must-have for any novice (or expert) kitchen. Although it doesn’t particularly excel at any one task, it is a very versatile knife that can be used for chopping and slicing vegetables, mincing herbs and cutting meat with ease. These knives usually range between 15cm and 30cm with 20cm being the most common size. This is your go-to knife for almost any job.

Paring Knife

The paring knife has a small blade making it a perfect substitute for a peeler. It is generally used for small fruits and vegetables and intricate work as the blade is small enough to be used in the hand. You will find that these blades are between 6 and 10 centimetres long and come in a range of different styles e.g. Bird’s Beak, Clip Point, Sheep’s Foot etc.

Utility Knife

Possessing a medium sized blade, the Utility Knife is used for cutting sandwich meats and vegetables that are too big for a Paring Knife but too small for a Chef’s Knife. Some cooks prefer to use this knife for intricate and creative works rather than the Paring Knife as they find it easier to control. These blades are usually between 9 and 10 centimetres in length and can be either serrated or straight edged.

Bread Knife

With its long serrated blade, the bread knife is able to cut through hard and soft bread without ripping or crushing it. This is due to the serrated edge giving a somewhat saw-like cut (backwards and forwards motion) meaning that less pressure is needed to slice through. These knives are usually between 15 and 25 centimetres long and may have an offset handle rather than a classic one to stop knuckles from getting caught between the work surface and knife.

These four knives are just the basics when it comes to decking your kitchen out for cooking, however, there are many more knives out there that can help make frequent tasks a lot faster and easier. For example, a carving knife has a thinner blade than other knives making meat slicing neater and a boning knife is a great addition to those who prefer to debone their meat and fish themselves.

At the end of the day, the perfect knife collection should reflect you and the type of cooking that you frequently do.

How many of these knives do you have in your kitchen and which knives from your collection could you not live without?


To celebrate the Global Family campaign, we have introduced the Global G-SNI301 KAZOKU Hybrid 3-piece knife set and at a very special price…

The knife set includes all three ranges of Global Knives and has been put together so you, home cooks and chefs alike, can decide for yourself which knife style suits you best.

The special knives included are:

  • G-62 – 18cm Cook’s Knife with a fluted blade
  • GNS-03 – 11cm Santoku Knife
  • SAI-M01 – 14cm Cook’s Knife with a clad blade

With this amazing set, we are also offering you a chance to win a fabulous prize!

Tucked away in each sleeve of the Hybrid set, there is a questionnaire asking you to rate each knife and to state which one out of the three different series you prefer.

If your entry has the most interesting answer, you will receive a full block set of knives from the series you chose as your favourite, so don’t miss out on this fantastic opportunity and find your local stockist here!

If you have any further queries, please email us at marketing@grunwerg.co.uk.


To celebrate the release of James Bond Spectre, we have decided to give away a GN-007!…

All you have to do is complete our Global NI Mission: find any word with ‘NI’ in the spelling and tweet us a picture! It could be a sign on a building, or a word in a magazine… be adventurous! We will judge the best finding and the winner will be awarded a Global NI GN-007 knife.

Entries will only be accepted if they are picture tweets to @globalknives_uk along with the hashtag #MissionNi.

The winner will be chosen by the Global Knives UK team on Friday 13th November.


The bubbly was fast flowing last Friday as I.Grunwerg proudly launched Global’s brand new series of knives, Global Ni…

Hosted at Roux at Parliament Square, I.Grunwerg invited over 50 members of the press to exclusively showcase the beautiful knife range.

Key members of press from national papers, magazines and trade publications enjoyed glasses of champagne and delicious canapes whilst browsing through the new range of NI knives and watching two Roux Scholarship winners, Armand Sablon and Paul O’Neill demonstrate their knife skills.

Members of I.Grunwerg were present to take questions and the Director, David Grunwerg, then introduced the knives and took a question and answer session with the eager members of press.

Armand Sablon, the Roux Scholarship winner of 2007 said, ‘It was exciting to be at the press event on Friday. There was a lot of interest from the press, and many questions were asked about the different knives and their purpose. I like the design of these knives; with the angle on the end you can actually get your precision. They are the best knives I have seen in a long, long time.

Paul O’Neill, winner of the Roux Scholarship 2013 adds, ‘Global NI is an exceptionally good knife. It was great to demonstrate these at the event and I hope they get the publicity they deserve.’

This range of Global NI knives has already been on sale in Steamer Trading since July, hosting great sales and positive reactions from both Steamer Trading staff and their customers.

This year Global Knives are celebrating 30 years of success, and have many awards in its cabinet to show this. After launching the Global SAI in 2011, the brand just keeps getting stronger and they now have Global NI to be proud of.

SOCIAL MEDIA

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VIDEOS

WATCH HELPFUL AND INTERESTING VIDEOS HERE








IN THE MEDIA

WHAT THE MEDIA HAS TO SAY ABOUT US

GQ Magazine – August 2017

CASS CHAPMAN – MICHEL ROUX JR CHOOSES HIS KITCHEN ESSENTIALS


Advisory HQ – July 2017

N/A – 2017 RANKING AND REVIEWS | TOP RANKING BEST CHEF KNIVES IN THE WORLD


The Times – May 14 2017

TOBY WISEMAN – STYLE COUNSEL


Independent – May 5 2017

10 BEST KITCHEN KNIVES


The Restaurant Magazine – December 2016 Issue

SHARP PRACTICE: HOW TO SHARPEN LIKE A PRO FROM MR GLOBAL HIMSELF

Pg. 51



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